Adapting to Change

The book "Who Moved my Cheese" is a good read for the individual or teams ready to identify bad habits and take a different direction. There are many lessons that stood out, but we will cover 6 lessons to think about. Since this is a short book, we will discuss the first three here which are: change happens regardless, you must try to anticipate the change and you want to monitor the change.


Lesson 1 – Change will happen regardless. There are two things that are out of our control, change and time! We all get 24 hours in a day. The only difference is in how we use the time we have. The best way we can adapt to change is by evaluating our own thoughts. I personally did this years ago. If I wanted something different, I had to think differently. By thinking differently this allowed me to adapt to the many life obstacles and take advantage of my time. When my environment changed, I needed to adapt, when my family changed, I needed to adapt, when my career changed, I needed to adapt so getting use to changing because normal overtime. This also took getting outside of my comfort zone.



Lesson 2 – you want to anticipate change whenever possible. For example, when moving careers or a residence you should prepare to limit some surprises. The change coming from a different environment, different coworkers, and different responsibilities should be anticipated. This should not be a surprise. Time to prepare for the change should take place.


Lesson 3 – was on monitoring the change. With a strategic mindset we should monitor the situations for our personal lives as well as our professional lives. The change should not be a surprise when things are being monitored. Leaders should monitor workplace environments to anticipate any potential changes.

Ways to adapt and monitor change is to develop goals and objectives around your plan and monitor the progress. Conducting a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats Analysis will help also. If you are interested in more, please visit www.mrshawnbiz.com.


Thank you,


Shawn Carrington